MAK Blog

This is some blog description about this site
Len Granowetter

Scaling up with MAK Legion: An update on Legion progress

Last month, MAK Technologies released MAK Legion 1.0 — the first commercial version of our new Scalability and Interoperability Framework. I wanted to update everyone on some of the ways we're already using MAK Legion to achieve distributed simulations at unprecedented scale. Many of our early Legion demos, as part of the US Army STE CSE program, w...
Continue reading
  298 Hits
Dan Brockway

What is Aggregate-Level Simulation anyway?

In version 4.3, VR-Forces introduces the notion of aggregate-level simulation. Okay. What exactly is the difference between aggregate-level simulation (ALS) and entity-level simulation (ELS)?

At the core, aggregate-level simulation is a more abstract level of modeling and therefore is more suitable for representing higher echelons of a force structure "” units like companies, battalions, and brigades. Entity-level modeling has the fidelity appropriate for individual entities, like vehicles and human characters. 

Lets look at maneuver modeling as an example. In ALS, units have to slow down to move through a forested area, whereas entities in ELS have to maneuver around individual trees. This higher level of abstraction happens for all the types of models. Combat in ELS happens when an entity has line of sight with another entity. When one entity fires, a hit/miss calculation is performed between the detonated ordinance and the nearby entities. Damage is assessed only for the entities that are actually hit. In ALS, units, which cover an area, must have line of sight to the "˜area’ of the other unit. Combat then proceeds as rates of change in the resources and status of the units. For example, a large, well-equipped unit will more quickly deplete the resources and status of a smaller less equipped unit.  

Continue reading
  5351 Hits
Dan Brockway

Teaching Marine Commanders to Detect Hidden Threats

Your squad has been tasked with a convoy mission through a town with suspected insurgent activity. As a surveillance operator, you need to spot the threats and alert your team before it’s too late.

You peer down from a UAV through an infrared camera analyzing and scrutinizing the happenings of a seemingly ordinary town. You see farmers in fields, children coming from and going to school, families en route to and from the marketplace, and religious services – everything seems normal but your training tells you that you need to look ahead. That’s when you notice signs of suspicious behavior: people moving to rooftops looking to the sky for incoming aircraft, armed civilians lurking behind corners, and most dangerous of all, a child wearing a heavily laden vest. You use your comms channels and report the potential threat to your squad leader. 

 

Continue reading
  4475 Hits